Vintages

You might think that it’s always sunny in Napa Valley and that the weather is pretty much always the same, however, there are major variations in Napa weather throughout the growing season that affect the quality and quantity of the grapes each year. Let’s take a look at the last 10 years of Napa weather to get a handle on what makes a great vintage.


Average Temperatures | Smaller Production

2020

Look for quality driven producers who consistently produce top-notch wines each year. Early picked grapes like Merlot might have fared better too.


Average Temperatures | Larger Production

2019

Very good Cabernet Sauvignon wines, many of which are good for cellaring for the medium term.


Average Temperatures | Larger Production

2018

This is a very structured and tannic vintage, best for cellaring for the long term.


Warmer Temperatures | Smaller Production

2017

Restrained styles, closer to European stylistically. Best to go for the top producers in this somewhat difficult vintage.


Average Temperatures | Smaller Production

2016

Not much was made so prices might be high for this excellent cellaring vintage


Warmer Temperatures | Smaller Production

2015

Fruit forward wines that are ripe - perfect for drinking now but can cellar for shorter periods.


Warmer Temperatures | Larger Production

2014

Some excellent Pinot Noirs and Syrahs along with others that will cellar well.


Average Temperatures | Larger Production

2013

Very tannic, structured wines meant for very long term cellaring


Average Temperatures | Larger Production

2012

Very fruit driven wines that are quite ripe, drinking now, and high volumes might mean good deals can be found


Cool Temperatures | Smaller Production

2011

Merlot did better than Cabernet this year, as did many of the white grapes.


Cool Temperatures | Smaller Production

2010

Not much made so prices might be high, but wines are long lived, perfect for long term cellaring - elegant.